The information of the communication form and the importance of the language

History of the word and concept "information" The English word apparently derives from the Latin stem information- of the nominative informatio: Inform itself comes via French informer from the Latin verb informare, which means to give form, or to form an idea of.

The information of the communication form and the importance of the language

This can and should be regarded as a mark of the enduring value of these models in highlighting key elements of that process for students who are taking the process apart for the first time.

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It remains, however, that the field of communication has evolved considerably since the 's, and it may be appropriate to update our models to account for that evolution.

This paper presents the classic communication models that are taught in introducing students to interpersonal communication and mass communication, including Shannon's information theory model the active modela cybernetic model that includes feedback the interactive model, an intermediary model sometimes referred to as a gatekeeper model of the two-step flowand the transactive model.

It then introduces a new ecological model of communication that, it is hoped, more closely maps to the the range of materials we teach and research in the field of communication today.

This model attempts to capture the fundamental interaction of language, medium, and message that enables communication, the socially constructed aspects of each element, and the relationship of creators and consumers of messages both to these elements and each other.

Introduction While the field of communication has changed considerably over the last thirty years, the models used in the introductory chapters of communication textbooks see Adler, ; Adler, Rosenfeld, and Towne, ; Barker and Barker, ; Becker and Roberts, ; Bittner, ; Burgoon, Hunsaker, and Dawson, ; DeFleur, Kearney, and Plax, ; DeVito, ; Gibson and Hanna, ; Wood, are the same models that were used forty years ago.

The information of the communication form and the importance of the language

This is, in some sense, a testament to their enduring value. Shannon's model of the communication process Figure 1 provides, in its breakdown of the flow of a message from source to destination, an excellent breakdown of the elements of the communication process that can be very helpful to students who are thinking about how they communicate with others.

It remains, however, that these texts generally treat these models as little more than a baseline.

The information of the communication form and the importance of the language

They rapidly segue into other subjects that seem more directly relevant to our everyday experience of communication. In interpersonal communication texts these subjects typically include the social construction of the self, perception of self and other, language, nonverbal communication, listening, conflict management, intercultural communication, relational communication, and various communication contexts, including work and family.

In mass communication texts these subjects typically include media literacy, media and culture, new media, media industries, media audiences, advertising, public relations, media effects, regulation, and media ethics. There was a time when our communication models provided a useful graphical outline of a semesters material.

This is no longer the case. This paper presents the classic models that we use in teaching communication, including Shannon's information theory model the active modela cybernetic model that includes feedback the interactive model, an intermediary model sometimes referred to as a gatekeeper model of the two-step flowand the transactive model.

Few textbooks cover all of these models together. Mass Communication texts typically segue from Shannon's model to a two-step flow or gatekeeper model.

Interpersonal texts typically present Shannon's model as the "active" model of the communication process and then elaborate it with interactive cybernetic and transactive models. Here we will argue the value of update these models to better account for the way we teach these diverse subject matters, and present a unifying model of the communication process that will be described as an ecological model of the communication process.

This model seeks to better represent the structure and key constituents of the communication process as we teach it today. Shannon's Model of the Communication Process Shannon's model of the communication process is, in important ways, the beginning of the modern field.

It provided, for the first time, a general model of the communication process that could be treated as the common ground of such diverse disciplines as journalism, rhetoric, linguistics, and speech and hearing sciences.

Part of its success is due to its structuralist reduction of communication to a set of basic constituents that not only explain how communication happens, but why communication sometimes fails.

Good timing played a role as well. The world was barely thirty years into the age of mass radio, had arguably fought a world war in its wake, and an even more powerful, television, was about to assert itself.

It was time to create the field of communication as a unified discipline, and Shannon's model was as good an excuse as any.

The model's enduring value is readily evident in introductory textbooks. It remains one of the first things most students learn about communication when they take an introductory communication class. Indeed, it is one of only a handful of theoretical statements about the communication process that can be found in introductory textbooks in both mass communication and interpersonal communication.

Shannon's Model of the communication process. Shannon's model, as shown in Figure 1, breaks the process of communication down into eight discrete components: Presumably a person who creates a message. The message, which is both sent by the information source and received by the destination.

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For Shannon's immediate purpose a telephone instrument that captures an audio signal, converts it into an electronic signal, and amplifies it for transmission through the telephone network. Transmission is readily generalized within Shannon's information theory to encompass a wide range of transmitters.

The simplest transmission system, that associated with face-to-face communication, has at least two layers of transmission. The first, the mouth sound and body gesturecreate and modulate a signal.

The second layer, which might also be described as a channel, is built of the air sound and light gesture that enable the transmission of those signals from one person to another.

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A television broadcast would obviously include many more layers, with the addition of cameras and microphones, editing and filtering systems, a national signal distribution network often satelliteand a local radio wave broadcast antenna.

The signal, which flows through a channel. There may be multiple parallel signals, as is the case in face-to-face interaction where sound and gesture involve different signal systems that depend on different channels and modes of transmission. A carrier or channel, which is represented by the small unlabeled box in the middle of the model.The speech-language pathologist will talk to you about your child’s communication and general development.

He or she will also use special spoken tests to evaluate your child. A hearing test is often included in the evaluation because a hearing problem can affect speech and language development. The Verb Recognize a verb when you see one. Verbs are a necessary component of all timberdesignmag.com have two important functions: Some verbs put stalled subjects into motion while other verbs help to clarify the subjects in meaningful ways.

Jul 10,  · The Importance of the English Language in Today's World. Updated on July 12, Zeeshan Naved. more.

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Contact Author. because it is so dominant in international communication, you will find more information regarding nearly every subject if you can speak this language. you will see the importance of English.

Any big Reviews: Nonverbal communication describes the processes of conveying a type of information in the form of non-linguistic representations. Examples of nonverbal communication include haptic communication, chronemic communication, gestures, body language, facial expressions, eye contact, and how one timberdesignmag.combal communication also relates .

Communication skills are important to everyone - they are how we give and receive information and convey our ideas and opinions with those around us. • verbal (sounds, language, and tone of voice). Communication is significant for managers in an organizations so as to perform the basic functions of management, i.e., Planning, Organizing, Leading and Controlling.

Communication helps managers to perform their jobs and responsibilities.

Models of the Communication Process