Idiom comparison

These terms are widely used to link two ideas together in writing, and to create flamboyant images for the reader.

Idiom comparison

Make a mountain out of a molehill From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Look up make a mountain out of a molehill in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Making a mountain out of a molehill is an idiom referring to over-reactive, histrionic behaviour where a person makes too much of a minor issue.

It seems to have come into existence in the 16th century. Metaphor[ edit ] Molehills at the foot of a Scottish mountain The idiom is a metaphor for the common behaviour of responding disproportionately to something - usually an adverse circumstance.

Usage note

One who "makes a mountain out of a molehill" is said to be greatly exaggerating the severity of the situation. The phrase itself is so common that a study by psychologists found that with respect to familiarity and image value, it ranks high among the common sayings they tested.

The meaning finds its opposite in the fable about the mountain in labour that gives birth to a mouse. In the former too much is made of little; in the latter one is led to expect much, but with too little result.

The two appear to converge in William Caxton 's translation of the fablewhere he makes of the mountain a hylle whiche beganne to tremble and shake by cause of the molle whiche delved it.

It was in the context of this bringing together of the two ideas that the English idiom grew.

Idiom comparison

Origin[ edit ] The earliest recorded use of the alliterative phrase making a mountain out of a molehill dates from The word for the animal involved was less than two hundred years old by then.

Previous to that the mole had been known by its Old English name wand, which had slowly changed to 'want'. A molehill was known as a 'wantitump', a word that continued in dialect use for centuries more.

The mountain and molehill seem to have been added by Udall [10] and the phrase has continued in popular use ever since. If the idiom was not coined by Udall himself, the linguistic evidence above suggests that it cannot have been in existence long.Definition of comparison in the Idioms Dictionary.

comparison phrase. What does comparison expression mean? Definitions by the largest Idiom Dictionary. Comparison - Idioms by The Free Dictionary Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

(there's) no comparison. The Working Papers should not be reported as representing the views of the Banco Central do Brasil.

The views expressed in the papers are those of the author(s) . a dictionary of French idioms and colloquialisms with English translations and explanations. The idioms used in comparisons are endlessly varied and subject to numerous colloquial errors, so this is a veritable treasure trove for the Sentence Correction to explore.

In previous posts, I discussed: a. the 'like' vs. 'as' distinction b.

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a . The idiom is a metaphor for the common behaviour of responding disproportionately to something - usually an adverse circumstance.

Idiom comparison

One who "makes a mountain out of a molehill" is said to be greatly exaggerating the severity of the situation. In cognitive psychology, this form of distortion is called magnification or overreacting. The phrase itself is so common that a study by psychologists. NEW PRODUCT ALERT!

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Difference between Idiom and Metaphor | Idiom vs Metaphor